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Presenter Profiles: Joint ADA/ISPAD Symposium—Pediatric Diabetes Insights

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2024 Presenter Profiles

Joint ADA/ISPAD Symposium—Pediatric Diabetes Insights and Innovations

Sunday, June 23, at 8:00 a.m. ET
Room W415C (Valencia Ballroom)
Orange County Convention Center


What Is New in Treatment of Preschool Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?

Carine de Beaufort, MD, PhD
Carine de Beaufort, MD, PhD

Carine de Beaufort, MD, PhD

Pediatric Diabetologist-Endocrinologist,
DECCP/Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg

What is your presentation about?
Preschool children with stage III type 1 diabetes are at higher risk to develop prematurely cardiovascular complications. It is vital to aim from diagnosis onwards at a physiological insulin replacement therapy. Pump treatment has facilitated this approach in the past with improved outcomes. The real breakthrough and jump forward, however, has been the automated insulin delivery (AID) system. Not only metabolic outcome — the best possible glycemic outcome with minimal insulin administration — but, as well, quality of life of carers and children has improved, importantly. Whenever available, the AID systems should be used for the treatment in all young children with diabetes. When not available or affordable, a sensor or multiple blood glucose controls should be available.

How do you hope your presentation will impact diabetes research or care?
At the end of last century, the subcutaneous pump was an eye opener for preschoolers and their carers (“It gave me back my life”). But the recent progress with AID systems has been a real game changer, with better metabolic outcomes as well as better perceived quality of life of carers. The AIDs with FDA approval or CE Mark for preschoolers are recommended as a first-line treatment in the 2022 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. At the global level, the treatment priorities are still different and insulin, pens and strips are priority and more complex.

How did you become involved with this area of diabetes research or care?
After med school in Rotterdam in 1982, I did my PhD (mentor/promotor GJ Bruining was one of the pioneers in Europe in the field of pediatric diabetes) on the effect of pump treatment on the remission period of children with diabetes. This randomized controlled trial was my first step in the world of pediatric diabetes mellitus and it has remained my focus ever since.


Innovations in Diabetes Education—App-Based Diabetes Technology Education and More…

Brynn E. Marks, MD, MSHPEd
Brynn E. Marks, MD, MSHPEd

Brynn E. Marks, MD, MSHPEd

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Director of Technology of the Diabetes Center,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

What is your presentation about?
Rapid advances in diabetes technologies have significantly improved care and outcomes for people living with diabetes but have also created challenges for busy clinicians who must learn the nuances of each automated insulin delivery system. The use of digital health for diabetes care has increased in recent years, however there are not enough physicians and diabetes educators to care for people with diabetes. The use of app-based, interactive educational tools has the potential to improve the use of diabetes technologies while also providing innovative solutions for an understaffed endocrinology workforce.

How do you hope your presentation will impact diabetes research or care?
While there have been significant advances in diabetes technologies, our approaches to diabetes education have remained largely unchanged over time. Raising awareness about successful, innovative approaches to education that are designed to meet the needs of today’s digital society has the potential to change the delivery of clinical care.

How did you become involved with this area of diabetes research or care?
As a technology obsessed person living with type 1 diabetes, I have always enjoyed learning the nuances of each automated insulin delivery (AID) system in order to provide the best possible care for people with type 1 diabetes. When the first AID system became available during my fellowship training, I realized that we needed innovative approaches to diabetes technology education to ensure that these technologies are successfully implemented in clinical care.

Register Today for the 84th Scientific Sessions


Join us in Orlando for the 84th Scientific Sessions, June 21-24. Full in-person registration includes access to all of the valuable onsite content during the meeting and on-demand access to the virtual program June 25-Aug. 26. For those unable to join us in-person, we are planning a virtual program to allow as many people as possible to participate and learn about the latest advances in diabetes research, prevention, and care.